English Lake District - Scafell

Colin Moss

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Quotations

Latest quote added: May 2015


















"The art of the future shall be to feed the interior life of individuals and will not be dominated by any theory: political, philosophical or religious". Cecil Collins, catalogue for exhibition at the Bloomsbury Gallery, 1935. Quoted in "The Magic Mirror, Thoughts and reflections on Cecil Collins", John Stewart Allitt, Temenos Academy, 2010.
"[on the writing of a poem] - If I knew where it would end, why start . . . What is interesting is the watersheds in the thought that can happen over a line break". Philip Gross, reading at the Vaughan Association, 2014
"The only reality is a shared reality, situated within a common ground". Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation, Vintage, 1998, p.195
"No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist". Oscar Wilde, Intentions, Methuen, 1891, The Decay of Lying, an Observation, p.44
"Even though I cannot foresee which path you will take with your law doctorate, I find the great contrast between your two occupations positive; the more diverse the life of the mind, the better the chances are that your inspiration will be protected, the inspiration which cannot be predicted, that which is motivated from within". Reiner Maria Rilke, letter to Elisabeth Ephrussi, quoted in The Hare with Amber Eyes, Edmund De Waal,Vintage Books, 2011, p.216
"Every poem is an act of discovery . . . for me it is an altered state of being, when I can reach the deeper strands of my inner being ." Jane Hirschfield, at Ledbury Poetry Festival, June 2012
"...that difference and the sense of not quite belonging that causes so many to become poets", William Ayot, at Poetry on the Border, October 2012
"The literary is not dependent on the philosophical, and the aesthetic is irreducible to ideology or metaphysics. Aesthetic criticism returns us to the autonomy of imaginative literature and the sovereignty of the solitary soul, the reader not as a person in society but as the deep self, our ultimate inwardness." Harold Bloom, The Western Canon, Macmillan/Papermac, 1995, Preface & Prelude, p.10
"The best culture is not divorced from life, but our most profound way to make sense of it." Harry Eyres The slow lane, Financial Times, December 29/30 2012
"I believe that poetry is about expanding our consciousness of a world of which we only have occasional glimpses." Peter Bennet PBS Bulletin 206 2005, p. 8
"The poem that can't be improved by a sympathetic reader's suggestion is as rare as a green-spotted unicorn." John Lucas, interview with William Oxley, Acumen 70, 2010, p. 15
"Man's perceptions are not bounded by organs of perception; he perceives more than sense can discover. " William Blake, There is no natural religion
"Poetry demands, even commands, concentration; it isolates a man willy-nilly, forcing its company on him unbidden. In the wide world (not to say in the great world) it is as awkward as a devoted mistress." Goethe, letter to Schiller, 1797, The Practical Wisdom of Goethe, trans Stanwell and Purtscher-Wydenbruck. Allen and Unwin 1933, p. 188
"[The word] 'Poet' must be used cautiously; it names an aspiration, not an occupation." Louise Glück, Proofs and Theories, Ecco Press, 1999, p. 21
"The poets are they who see that spiritual is greater than any material force, that thoughts rule the world." Emerson, Preface to Parnassus 1874
"How much there is in simply seeing! . . we are as much as we see." Thoreau, Journal 9 April 1841
"My father used to speak of the 'poetry of life'; and without that poetry - that magic - [the] body may be fed by planners and economists, but the soul dies. It is for this that the arts exist, not as entertainment, or as a pastime, hobby, therapy and the like, but as the living mainstream of any civilisation." Kathleen Raine, 'The use of poetry', Temenos Academy Review 7, p. 21.
"An artist is one who knows how life should always be lived at its best and is always aware of how badly he is doing it. An artist is one who knows he is failing in living and feeds his remorse by making something fair . . ." Thornton Wilder, introduction to The Angel that troubled the waters, Longmans, 1928
"Poetry teaches a man to do more than observe merely factual errors and measurable truths . . . it compels him to resist stock responses, because it compels him to examine the emotional significance, as well as the rational significance, of whatever comes under his notice."  Norman MacCaig, 'My way of it', Chapman 16 (Summer 1976). Quoted in Marjory McNeil, Norman MacCaig, a study of his life and work, Mercat Press (1996), p. 99.

UFC productions 2012